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American Urological Association, May 4-8, 2013

American Urological Association, May 4-8, 2013

The American Urological Association's 2013 Annual Meeting (http://www.aua2013.org/ )

The annual meeting of the American Urological Association was held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego and attracted more than 12,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in urology. The conference highlighted recent advances in the prevention, detection, and treatment of urologic conditions, with presentations focusing on the advancement of urologic patient care.

In one study, Matthew Lane Purcell, M.D., of the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and colleagues found that 7 percent of men (average age, 35) coming into their practice to be evaluated for infertility were on supplemental testosterone.

"Of the men we studied, we looked at a semen sample on testosterone and then a semen sample once they stopped taking testosterone. The average sperm concentration dramatically increased once the testosterone was discontinued. The average sperm concentration while on testosterone was 1.8 million per ml. This increased significantly to an average of 24 million/ml after the testosterone was stopped," said Purcell. "Sixty percent of the men we studied actually had no sperm in their semen while on testosterone. After [stopping] testosterone, only 15 percent had no sperm. It should be noted that not all men recovered sperm concentrations after stopping testosterone. This could be from the testosterone supplement or could be related to a more serious underlying problem."

Abstract No. 2292 (http://www.aua2013.org/abstracts/archive/printabstracts.cfm?id=2292 )

In another study, Mathew Sorensen, M.D., of the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, and colleagues found that postmenopausal women who engage in small or medium amounts of regular physical activity appear to have a 16 to 31 percent lower risk of kidney stone formation compared to inactive women.

"The amount of weekly activity necessary to see this maximal benefit is equivalent to four hours of light gardening, three hours of average walking at two to three miles per hour, or one hour of moderate jogging at six miles per hour," said Sorensen. "Also, women who consumed over 2,200 kcalories/day were at greater risk of forming kidney stones (by up to 42 percent). But calorie intake of fewer than 1,800 kcalories/day was not protective against kidney stone formation."

The investigators also found that, even after accounting for exercise and calorie intake, higher body mass index remained a major risk factor for stone formation (21 to 36 percent increased risk).

"Even small amounts of regular activity appear to protect against kidney stone formation and this is due to the amount of activity not the intensity of exercise," said Sorensen. "This study needs to be confirmed in younger women or in men and perhaps in an intervention type study to confirm this effect, but we see little downside in encouraging our patients to become more active."

Press Release (https://www.auanet.org/advnews/press_releases/article.cfm?articleNo=295 )

Peter Clark, M.D., of the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues found that statin use at the time of surgery for kidney cancer was associated with a lower risk of death, either from any cause or from kidney cancer.

"What we found was that, even after correcting for other potential variables that could influence outcomes, patients who were on a statin at the time of surgery were less likely to die of any cause and less likely to die due to their cancer than patients who were not on a statin," said Clark. "The next critical steps are to better understand the mechanism for this observation and to determine if the length of time a patient is on a statin influences these outcomes. While it is premature to recommend taking a statin solely to prevent or treat kidney cancer, this study at least demonstrates that for those patients who are on a statin for the management of hyperlipidemia it is safe to remain on that medication after their surgery."

Press Release (https://www.auanet.org/admin/press/ajaxpg.cfm?view=1&thisPR=313&width=850&height=620&rand=8349 )

AUA: ER Visits for Hematuria Pose Sizeable Economic Burden

THURSDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department visits attributed to hematuria pose a considerable economic burden, according to two studies presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract 1 (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)02919-4/fulltext )Abstract 2 (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)01723-0/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org )

AUA: Death Up in Weekend ER Visits for Prostate Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metastatic prostate cancer, visiting the emergency department over the weekend is associated with increased odds of mortality, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)00556-9/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org )

AUA: Primary Care Treatment for UTI Could Save $2 Billion

THURSDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- About two billion dollars a year could be saved if people diagnosed with a urinary tract infection (UTI) in the emergency room had been treated in an outpatient clinic instead, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)00924-5/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org/ )

AUA: Websites for Testosterone Replacement Mum on Risks

TUESDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Most websites promoting testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) do not mention the risk of side effects, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)03271-0/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org/ )

AUA: Many Men With Erectile Dysfunction Untreated

MONDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Only about a quarter of men diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED) receive treatment, despite the availability and heavy media promotion of treatments, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)03023-1/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org/ )

AUA: Low-Dose Pill Linked to Chronic Pelvic Pain Symptoms

MONDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the low-dose oral contraceptive pill (OCP) is associated with increased incidence of chronic pelvic pain symptoms and pain during or after sexual climax, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)03269-2/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org )

AUA: Incidence of Testicular Cancer Up Through 2009

MONDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) increased from 1992 to 2009, especially among Hispanic men, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 4 to 8 in San Diego.

Abstract (http://www.jurology.com/article/S0022-5347(13)00788-X/fulltext )More Information (http://www.aua2013.org )