Skip to main content
Avg ER Wait
Checking ER Wait Time
The feed could not be reached
Blake Medical Center

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Disabilities


Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the back up of acid or food from the stomach to the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that connects the mouth and stomach. GER is common in infants. It may cause them to spit up. Most infants outgrow GER within 12 months.

GER that progresses to esophageal injury and other symptoms is called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The backed-up acid irritates the lining of the esophagus. It causes heartburn, a pain in the stomach and chest. GERD requires treatment to avoid complications.

GERD can occur at any age.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
si1347 97870 1 gerd
Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.


The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a muscular ring between the esophagus and the stomach. It relaxes to let food pass into the stomach then, closes shut to prevent it from backing up. With GERD, the ring doesn't close as tightly as it normally should. This causes acid reflux, a burning sensation that can be felt below the breastbone.

The following factors contribute to GERD:

  • Problems with the nerves that control the LES
  • Problems with LES muscle tone
  • Impaired peristalsis—muscular contractions that propel food toward the stomach
  • Abnormal pressure on the LES
  • Increased relaxation of the LES
  • Increased pressure within the abdomen

Risk Factors

Factors that may increase your child’s chance of GERD include:


GERD may cause:

  • Chronic heartburn—most common symptom
  • Difficulty swallowing or choking with feedings
  • Impaired breathing during sleep—sleep apnea
  • Refusal to eat
  • Increased mouth secretions
  • Regurgitation or vomiting
  • Bloody vomit
  • Weight loss or poor weight gain
  • Frequent aspiration pneumonia or respiratory problems
  • Coughing or wheezing
  • Hoarseness
  • Arching back while feeding
  • Irritability or restlessness while feeding


The doctor will ask about your child's symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Your child may need to see a pediatric gastroenterologist. This type of doctor focuses on diseases of the stomach and intestines.

Images may need to be taken of your child's stomach and esophagus. This can be done with:

Other tests may include:

  • 24-hour pH monitoring—a probe is placed in the esophagus to keep track of the acid in the lower esophagus
  • Short trial of medications—success or failure of medication may help your doctor understand the cause


There are 3 goals for treatment. The first is to prevent injury to the esophagus. The second is to make sure your child is eating enough. The third goal is to keep the backed up food and acid from getting into the lungs. This will require a team approach. Your child may work with the pediatrician, specialized doctors, and a variety of therapists.

Talk with the doctor about the best treatment plan for your child. Treatment options include:

Feeding Management

It is important that your child is able to get the food needed for good health. GERD can make it difficult for your child to eat. Your doctor may recommend a feeding tube. This is a tube that is inserted through your child's nose and into the stomach. It will deliver the nutrients your child needs. The feeding tube will also decrease the risk of choking and ease the stress of feeding.


Most GERD in children can be relieved with lifestyle changes. Medication may be given if your child's GERD doesn't improve. Medications can help to decrease acid in the stomach and help the esophagus heal. Medication options may include:

  • H-2 blockers
  • Proton pump inhibitors

Many of these are over-the-counter medications that are available in liquid or powder form.


Surgery or endoscopy may be recommended with more severe cases.

The most common surgery is called fundoplication. During this procedure, a part of the stomach will be wrapped around the stomach valve. This makes the valve stronger. It should prevent stomach acid from backing up into the esophagus. This surgery is often done through small incisions in the skin.


There are no current guidelines to prevent GERD.

Revision Information

  • Reviewer: Kari Kassir, MD
  • Review Date: 01/2015 -
  • Update Date: 05/05/2014 -
  • GI Kids—North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

  • National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Canadian Digestive Health Foundation

  • About Kids Health—The Hospital for Sick Children

  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children and adolescents. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases website. Available at: Updated August 2006. Accessed May 10, 2013.

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: Updated June 22, 2012. Accessed May 10, 2013.

  • Pediatric GE reflux clinical practice guidelines. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001;32:S1-S31.